Victorian Rules for an Unmarried Woman | Meredith Sweetpea


victorian-womanIn the Victorian years there were strict standards for how men and women were to behave. Those who did not follow these rules were ostracized or shunned in polite society. These expectations were set in stone, and especially held dear to the unmarried women in a community.

Rules for the Single Victorian Woman

  • Never go out alone. Always be accompanied by a female companion or a male family member.
  • Do not ride in a closed carriage with a man who is not a relative.
  • Do not receive gentleman callers when alone at the house.
  • When receiving a gentleman caller, another family member must be present in the room.
  • Never visit an unmarried gentleman at his residence.
  • Never speak about impure topics among other single women.
  • Do not touch a gentleman when walking together; only accept his hand of assistance if needed to navigate.
  • Never address someone unless introduced to them.

In addition, a single woman was to uphold her innocence at all costs. She was not to show her intelligence, but rather, to submit to the gentlemen in the room. Political talk was always scorned upon.

Love and Courtship of the Unmarried Victorian Woman

Victorian-courtship

Victorian love and courtship

When it came to love and courtship, an unmarried Victorian woman was encourage to marry up and never down. She often brought a dowry to the marriage, especially if she was from an upper class family, and he must prove that he was of equal or better standing than she by disclosing his financial situation. Continue reading

Wedding Omens and Predictions


Queenb-Victoria-Orange-BlossomsFor centuries, people declared that there were omens that could predict weddings and happy marriages. Here are some of the ones the Victorians believed, and some we still believe today:

You (or someone you know) will be married soon when:

  • A chicken enters your house with a straw in its mouth, which it leaves behind.
  • A mockingbird flies over your house.
  • A white dove comes near your house.
  • A spider descends from the ceiling and “dances” up and down.
  • A cow moos at night.

Your marriage will be happy if:

  • You feed a cat at of one of your old shoes just before you marry.
  • A cat sneezes in front of the (or your) bride on the day before the wedding.
  • Either party dreams about the wedding day.
  • You marry in June.
  • Your wedding ceremony lasts between a half hour and an hour (the rising hand of the clock denotes rising fortune.)
  • You marry in the afternoon.
  • You marry on a beautiful day.
  • Continue reading

Timeless New Years Toasts


Happy-New-Year-Victorian-PostcardWho doesn’t need a great toast for New Year’s Eve parties?

Here are timeless toasts you can use this year:

Here’s to the year past and friends who have left us,
Here’s to the present and the friends who are here,
Here’s to the New Year and the new friends who will join us.

– – – – – – –

Welcome be ye that are here,
Welcome all, and make good cheer,
Welcome all, another year.

– – – – – – –

Here’s to a bright New Year
And a fond farewell to the old;
Here’s to the things that are yet to come
And to the memories that we hold.

– – – – – – –

May all your troubles during the coming year
Be as short as your New Year’s resolutions. Continue reading

Victorian Inventions We Couldn’t Live Without Today | Meredith Sweetpea


Victorian-woman-on-sewing-machine

A fine Victorian invention

We see lines at the electronics store when the new smartphone comes out, and frenzies at the toy store when a popular doll is sold out.  Miss Meredith Sweetpea was wondering what inventions Victorians made that we couldn’t live without today.

Telephone

The telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell and patented in 1876. He just barely Continue reading

Louisa May Alcott | Meredith Sweetpea


Miss Meredith Sweetpea loved reading Little Women and Little Men by Louisa May Alcott when she was growing up. Didn’t you? After coming across my dog-eared copies, I thought I’d share a little more about the Victorian author behind these beloved books.

Louisa May Alcott’s Youth

Louisa-May-Alcott

Author Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott was born November 29, 1832 in Germantown (near Philadelphia), Pennsylvania to Transcendentalist and educator Amos Bronson Alcott and social worker Abby May. She was the second of four daughters.

The family moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1838, where her father opened an experimental school and joined the Transcendental Club with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

Her father maintained strict views on Continue reading

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