Am I the Granddaughter of King Henry VIII? | Meredith Sweetpea


Henry_Carey_King_Henry_VIII_comparison

L: Henry Carey; R: King Henry VIII; Middle: mashup of the two. The resemblance is uncanny. Could he be King Henry VIII’s son?

When Miss Meredith Sweetpea read the best-selling historical novel “The Other Boleyn Girl” she was captivated by the story, and read the entire book in one sitting. Have you read it?

The story, written by British historian Philippa Gregory, tells the tale of Mary Boleyn, Anne Boleyn’s older sister, who had a long-term affair with, and two children by, King Henry VIII prior to his meeting and subsequently marrying Anne. It is told from Mary’s point of view, beginning with Mary at the naive age of 14.

This book penetrated my mind, and for years, lingered with a familiarity unclaimed by any other novel.

Years later, I began to research my genealogy, and was shocked and pleasantly surprised to find out that I am the 18th great-granddaughter of Mary Boleyn through each of these two children supposedly conceived through King Henry VIII: Catherine and Henry Carey (Mary was married to William Carey).

Are these the children of King Henry VIII?

Although it has never been proven that these two are the children of King Henry VIII, nor were they ever acknowledged or legitimized by the regent, there are a number of indicators that they may be. For one, it is said that Henry closely resembled King Henry.

  • William Carey was given a number of royal grants between 1522 and 1526, which generally indicate a reward.
  • Henry claimed in 1533 that he was “Our Sovereign Lord the King’s Son.”
  • Anne Boleyn became Henry’s ward after the death of Mary’s husband William Carey.
  • Henry VIII admitted to his affair with Mary, which he probably would not have done had he not issued children with her.
  • Both children were born during the time of the affair.
  • Elizabeth I (Anne Boleyn’s daughter) loved the Carey children and bestowed favors upon them. Henry was knighted by her and made Bason Hunsdon. Elizabeth also visited him on his deathbed and gave him the patent and robes of the Earldom of Wiltshire. Henry’s son, Robert, received Queen Elizabeth I’s ring from her hand upon her death.
  • Catherine Carey was Queen Elizabeth I’s most senior lady-in-waiting, and was buried at Royal expense and given a prominent memorial when she died.

It is rumored that King Henry VIII may have acknowledged these children, but he had already taken in HenryFitzhugh as his legitimate child. He was the child of an affair with Bessie Blount.

The_Other_Boleyn_GirlIt is exciting to know that I am the descendant of this woman who so captivated me through her story, and believe that I am the 18th great-granddaughter of King Henry VIII. Perhaps there is something in our DNA that recognizes those who came and went long before us, and left their mark upon our futures.

–facts excerpted from The Anne Boleyn Files

 

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From Her Majesty’s Jewel Box Blog | Meredith Sweetpea


Miss Meredith Sweetpea has been following a blog called “From Her Majesty’s Jewel Box” for a while now and truly enjoys viewing the various jewels worn by Queen Elizabeth II and the Duchess of Cornwall that are posted regularly.

In her blog, the self-pronounced “one snarky magpie American” attempts to chronicle the jewels worn by the royals on their daily engagements. The posts give a brief history of the jewels and links to other events where the jewels can be seen.

There are also sections within the blog where readers can view the jewels by category, like “Tiaras & Crowns,” “Brooches: Ornamental,” and “Orders & Regalia.”

It has been great fun to check on the latest activities of the Queen as well as view the various jewelry she wears that often honors the occasion. For instance, at a recent Ceremony of the Keys event, during her annual week of Scottish engagements, Queen Elizabeth II wore the Royal Regiment of Scotland Badge, the appropriate military badge.

The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara

Some jewels make more frequent appearances than others, lending one to believe that the Queen may have favorites among the bunch. She is most often seen wearing Queen Mary’s Button Earrings and a Three Strand Pearl Necklace, for example.

The Most Famous Tiara: The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland

One of the Queen’s favorite tiaras is the Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara, which was presented to Elizabeth in 1947 as a wedding present from her grandmother, Queen Mary. It was her first tiara and is one of her most recognizable pieces due to its widespread use on British currency and coinage.

For a fun look at the Queen’s jewels, take a look at this blog. Wait, you might want to don your own tiara first.

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