The Meaning of Flowers | Victorian History


In her last post, Meredith Sweetpea discussed how the Language of Flowers began in the Victorian era, and promised to list a variety of flowers and their meaning in this post. Here is her promise fulfilled.

Flowers and their Meaning

  • Acacia – Secret love
  • Apple Blossom – Preference
  • Azalea – Temperance
  • Bachelor’s Buttons – Celibacy
  • Basil – Hatred
  • Pink Carnation – A woman’s love
  • Chamomile – Energy in Adversity
  • Daffodil – Regard
  • Daisy – Innocence
  • Dogwood – Durability
  • Fennel – Strength
  • Forget-me-not – True love
  • Goldenrod – Precaution
  • Holly – Foresight
  • Honeysuckle – Generous & devoted affection
  • Iris – Message
  • Ivy – Fidelity
  • Jasmine – Amiability
  • Lavender – Distrust
  • Lily – Purity
  • Marigold – Sorrow
  • Morning Glory – Affectation
  • Myrtle – Love & marriage
  • Narcissus – Egotism
  • Nightshade – Secrets
  • Oak – Hospitality
  • Oleander – Beware
  • Orange Flowers – Chastity
  • Pansy – Thoughtfulness
  • Periwinkle – Friendship
  • Primrose – Consistency
  • Quince – Temptation
  • Rhododendron – Danger
  • Single Rose – Simplicity
  • Sage – Domestic virtue
  • Sweet William – Gallantry
  • Thistle – Defiance
  • Tulip – Fame
  • Blue Violet – Faithfulness
  • Water Lily- Purity of heart
  • Wisteria – I cling to thee
  • Zinnia – Thoughts of absent friends
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