From Her Majesty’s Jewel Box Blog | Meredith Sweetpea


Miss Meredith Sweetpea has been following a blog called “From Her Majesty’s Jewel Box” for a while now and truly enjoys viewing the various jewels worn by Queen Elizabeth II and the Duchess of Cornwall that are posted regularly.

In her blog, the self-pronounced “one snarky magpie American” attempts to chronicle the jewels worn by the royals on their daily engagements. The posts give a brief history of the jewels and links to other events where the jewels can be seen.

There are also sections within the blog where readers can view the jewels by category, like “Tiaras & Crowns,” “Brooches: Ornamental,” and “Orders & Regalia.”

It has been great fun to check on the latest activities of the Queen as well as view the various jewelry she wears that often honors the occasion. For instance, at a recent Ceremony of the Keys event, during her annual week of Scottish engagements, Queen Elizabeth II wore the Royal Regiment of Scotland Badge, the appropriate military badge.

The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara

Some jewels make more frequent appearances than others, lending one to believe that the Queen may have favorites among the bunch. She is most often seen wearing Queen Mary’s Button Earrings and a Three Strand Pearl Necklace, for example.

The Most Famous Tiara: The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland

One of the Queen’s favorite tiaras is the Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara, which was presented to Elizabeth in 1947 as a wedding present from her grandmother, Queen Mary. It was her first tiara and is one of her most recognizable pieces due to its widespread use on British currency and coinage.

For a fun look at the Queen’s jewels, take a look at this blog. Wait, you might want to don your own tiara first.

A True Gentleman Is… | Meredith Sweetpea | Manners Quotes


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“A true gentleman is one that apologizes anyways, even though he has not offended a lady intentionally.
He is in a class all of his own because he knows the value of a woman’s heart.”

–Shannon L. Alder

Fabulous Fascinators of the Royal Ascot Races


ascot-hatHere is a video showcasing some of the fabulous hats and fascinators seen at the Royal Ascot Races in England. Enjoy!

Hats of Ascot video

The Royal Ascot Races begin today, June 20, 2017 through June 24th and attract the finest racehorses from around the world. But some people think the real spectacle is the fashion — the fabulous hats and outfits worn by the spectators.

Ascot Even Has a Dress Code for Hats and Fascinators

The Ascot races website lists a Dress Code for what to wear in the Royal Enclosure, the Queen Anne and Village Enclosures, and the Windsor Enclosure. If you’re lucky enough to be in the Royal Enclosure, the dress code cites that “Hats should be worn; however, a headpiece which has a solid base of 4 inches (10 cm) or more in diameter is acceptable as an alternative to a hat. Fascinators are not permitted; neither are headpieces which do not have a solid base covering a sufficient area of the head (4 inches/10 cm).”

Miss Meredith Sweetpea wishes she could be there to witness the delightful garden of hats herself. Send us pictures of yourself attending Ascot in your hat!

Why Should I Wear a Fascinator on the Right?


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Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall wears a fascinator.

A number of kind readers have been asking Miss Meredith Sweetpea lately why a fascinator is traditionally worn on the right-hand side of the head.

The custom runs far back into history to when women were generally accompanied by men when they walked down the street. Women of any stature would rarely have occasion to walk alone; she was escorted by her husband, or if single, her father or brother. And of course, both men and women always wore a hat whenever outdoors.

Wearing the Fascinator on the Right Made Perfect Sense

Men traditionally carried their weapon, such as a sword, on their left-hand side, so it made sense that when walking with a woman (when armed), she walk on his right-hand side. Even when men no longer carried swords, the tradition of putting the women on a man’s right continued.

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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge wears her fascinator on the right.

Another reason to put the women on a man’s right was to position the man between the woman and the street to help protect her fine skirts from becoming splashed by passing carriages or horses traversing the often-muddy roadways.

Therefore, in order to have conversation when walking down the street, a women would tilt her hat to the right to offer a better view of her face to her companion. This also prettily framed her face perfectly for flirting, which only added to her fascination. The pert angle of the hat took on the name “fascinator.”

Today’s milliners often design a fascinator to sit on the right-hand side, in keeping with tradition. But many fascinators are made to suit either side of the face, or to be worn in the center of the head at a slightly forward angle toward. Some people even prefer to wear their fascinator to cover the part in their hair, believing it more attractive worn that way.

There is no hard-and-fast rule about which side is the correct side to wear a fascinator. It is simply up to you to choose.

Woman are Always Right

The tradition of having the women walk on the inside of the man on the street carries on today with polite men and women. Remember the catchphrase, “Women are always right” and it will be easy to remember.

Read More About Fascinators

For more information about fascinators, read our other posts:

Find Your Perfect Fascinator

  • Do you have a fascinator? Browse more than a thousand darling Fascinators! You might just find one that’s perfect for your look.

 

How to Signal to the Waitstaff That You are Done Eating


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Fork and knife placement signaling the end of the meal – American style.

Miss Meredith Sweetpea had the rare pleasure of dining out this past weekend with a dear friend. We went to a local Italian restaurant, of the mid-range variety, nothing fancy.

This friend had plenty to talk about, and we were settling into a wonderful conversation as the courses began to arrive, but began to become annoyed by the constant interruption of the server. It seemed whenever we paused and put down our forks, and even while we were eating,  someone came over to grab the plate away–even though we obviously were not finished.

At first, the servers reached down to grab the plates and began to remove them without asking. We had to grab our plates back as they swooped past. After a few times of this, they at least began to ask if we were done yet. In addition, at two times, the managers stopped by our table to see how things were going. They too, grabbed at our plates.

At first, we laughed about the constant interruptions. Then they began to irritate us. What then should have been an enjoyable time out together, was spoiled. We took the rest of our meals to go. Continue reading

When did Groundhog Day Start?


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Punxsatawney Phil on Groundhog Day

On February 2, 1887, Punxsatawney, Pennsylvania newspaper editor Clymer Freas invented the idea of Groundhog Day. According to reports, he convinced a group of businessmen and groundhog hunters known as the Punxsatawney Groundhog Club to trek to a site called Gobbler’s Knob to hold an “official” ceremony. If the groundhog saw his shadow, it would be considered bad news.

In modern days, the February festivities that attract tens of thousands of spectators over three days are presided over by the Inner Circle, a band of local dignitaries who wear top hats and speak in the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch dialect (supposedly this is called “Groundhogese”). This well-known groundhog is known as “Punxsatawney Phil.”

Tradition states that if the groundhog emerges from his burrow and sees his shadow on this day, six more weeks of winter will follow. If he does not see his shadow, it means an indication of an early spring. Maybe we shouldn’t rely on Phil’s forecast so much though, the National Climatic Data Center and the Canadian weather service report his accuracy at less than 40%. Yet still, it is a fun tradition that continues today.

Ancient Significance of February 2nd

The date of February 2nd falls midway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox and was noted for its significance by many ancient cultures. Continue reading

The Real Test of Good Manners | Meredith Sweetpea | Manners Quotes


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“The real test of good manners is to be able to put up with bad manners pleasantly.”

–Khalil Gibran

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